News

Scientists Venture to South Pole for Answers

Travel to one of the coldest, windiest, and most barren places on Earth does not require a passport. This isn’t because of Antarctica’s inhospitable conditions or lack of long-term residents. It’s because of an agreement of no territorial claim among 53 countries that have vested research interests in this massive snow-covered landmass at the South
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Fishermen Say Narragansett Bay Too Clean

By Alex Kuffner | Courtesy of the Providence Journal NARRAGANSETT — Narragansett Bay is cleaner and clearer than it’s been in decades. But after huge strides in treating wastewater and controlling storm runoff, some are asking a question that would have been unthinkable just a few years ago about what is arguably Rhode Island’s most
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Unlocking the Past is Key for the Future

Sometimes to move forward you have to go back – sometimes as far as hundreds of thousands or millions of years. This is the case for scientists looking to reconstruct the past in order to better understand climatic changes happening today and what may be expected in the future. What researchers are finding is that while
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How Rhode Island Can Resist Rising Seas

Gone are the days when coastal infrastructure could be built for a slowly changing environment. By Alex Kuffner | Courtesy of The Providence Journal WARWICK — Tucked in amongst the grass and shrubs along the shoreline just a short walk from Oakland Beach is a patch of crumbling asphalt. This is where Sea View Drive
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Researchers Assess Community Support for Shellfish Aquaculture in Rhode Island

Over the past 20 years, the amount of submerged land used for aquaculture in Rhode Island has been growing steadily, with some stakeholders expressing concerns about user conflicts, leaving coastal managers in need of better understanding the social issues related to aquaculture development. Tracey Dalton and Robert Thompson, both University of Rhode Island marine affairs
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Carbon: Too Much of a Good Thing

Carbon is the backbone of life. It is literally in our bones among everything else from plants and rocks to the air we breathe and in the oceans. With the unique ability to bond to a multitude of atoms, carbon can build large, complex carbon-based molecules necessary to sustain all living matter. “It’s fuel and
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The Woonasquatucket River

Shoreline-ri.com: Waterplace and India Point Parks

It was a beautiful August afternoon—a perfect day to spend some time by the water. My older son and I had about three hours, the length of his brother’s playdate, with one caveat—we had to be close enough to return quickly in case the playdate went sour, such as if, for example, someone broke an
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Predicting the Next “Superstorm”

Sandy, Irene, Katrina, Andrew, and Bob are all retired hurricane names that read like a list of exes whose wake of destruction was not anticipated and whom we hope to never see again. These storms were some of the costliest and deadliest storms in U.S. history, catching communities off-guard with severe winds, storm surge, and
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Storms May Have Big Impact on Ozone, Climate

Just before an onslaught of heavy rain, howling wind, and thundering lightning, there’s often a sharp, distinctive odor in the air. That’s the smell of ozone being carried down from higher altitudes by a storm’s downdrafts. High in the stratosphere, the second layer of the earth’s atmosphere, ozone acts as a protective shield. This is
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Rocky Point Arch

Shoreline-ri.com: Visiting Rocky Point State Park More Than a Nostalgia Tour

I was due for a visit to Rocky Point State Park to add it to our shoreline-ri.com web app. The description on the state parks website was not encouraging. It was full of nine sensible rules for safety (stay on the path!) and keeping the park clean (don’t remove anything from the park, other than
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